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Media: Apartments designed for working at home and self-isolation will be a new priority, experts say

Media: Apartments designed for working at home and self-isolation will be a new priority, experts say

Ben Pomroy

Featured in Domain, Rothelowman Principal Ben Pomroy explains how Covid-19 is impacting frameworks of thought around apartment design.

 

Our weeks spent in COVID-19 isolation at home will trigger a complete rethink on the design of apartments of the future, say some of Australia’s leading architects.

Before the pandemic, balconies were considered nice but non-essential, access to communal space a bit of an expensive luxury, study spaces less important than large lounge-dining areas, and as for high-speed internet … well, you could always download in the office.

But today, we’re seeing a complete shift in our ideas of how apartments should look and function.

“People have never spent as much time in their apartments before and now they’re receiving a real education in design – seeing how the sun enters the rooms during the day, how much fresh air they receive and how they use outdoor space,” said Ben Pomroy, principal at architecture firm Rothelowman.

“It’s changing people’s attitudes and what’s important to them. There’ll be a definite permanent mark left from this period, and we’ll be living differently in the future, with more flexible working, both from home and from the office. As a result, the little study nooks won’t cut it any more, people will want liveable outdoor space and more personal space.”

Two-storey apartments may well come back into fashion, too. Although they’re the same size as those on one level, the different floors afford residents more opportunities to get away from each other and have more of their own space and privacy when in the apartment together.

Pomroy has just designed a series of two-storey townhouses at the $260 million 332-apartment and townhouse development Babylon in Rouse Hill, due to start construction soon, and demand for them off the plan is strong. “People like the idea of getting away from the others living in the same space,” he said.

“And I think that kind of design will become even more popular as a result of what we’ve been through.”

 

Read the whole article online via domain.com.au

Pictured: The series of two-storey townhouses at the $260 million 332-apartment and townhouse development Babylon in Rouse Hill. Two-storey apartments and townhouses could become a regular feature, creating more space for users, in response to Covid-19.